Canadian Uncorrected Refractive Error Study (CURES)

Dates: 2008 - Ongoing
Principal Investigator: Dr. Barbara Robinson, School of Optometry, University of Waterloo
Co-Investigators: Drs. Yunwei Feng, Craig Woods and Des Fonn, School of Optometry, University of Waterloo; and Drs. Deborah Gold and Keith Gordon, CNIB.
Funders: CNIB Research Grants and Fellowships Program, Essilor Canada, Canadian Association of Optometrists and COETF, New Brunswick Association of Optometrists, Quebec Association of Optometrists (Fondation Quebecoise pour la sante visuelle), Alberta Association of Optometrists, Saskatchewan Association of Optometrists. In kind contributions provided by the CCLR (UW) and CNIB. Equipment loaned by Innova Medical Ophthalmics.
Contact:Barbara Robinson, robinson@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca
Research Administration Coordinator, CNIB Research, Tel: 416-486-2500 x7622 Email: research@cnib.ca

Uncorrected refractive error is the leading cause of visual impairment in the world. In Canada there are potentially 2 million people with visual impairment that could be corrected by simply wearing glasses or contact lenses. This number will double in the next 20 years due to Canada’s rapidly ageing population. Visual impairment can seriously affect quality of life. People with vision problems are more likely to fall, have a higher risk of fractures and other injuries, and they may be more likely to limit or stop driving. Visual impairment is also an independent risk factor for increased mortality in older persons.

There is currently no data available on the prevalence of visual impairment or uncorrected refractive error in Canada.

This study will provide for the first time a population-based estimate of the prevalence of visual impairment and blindness in Canada. It will look at the magnitude and distribution of vision loss. It will identify how many people have correctable versus uncorrectable visual impairment. It will both quantify and qualify the burden of vision loss.

This proposal project represents a collaboration of researchers from the CNIB and the School of Optometry, University of Waterloo. This study will provide for the first time a population-based estimate of the prevalence of visual impairment and blindness in Canada. It will look at the magnitude and distribution of vision loss. It will identify how many people have correctable versus uncorrectable visual impairment. It will both quantify and qualify the burden of vision loss.