CNIB Corporate Video - Transcript

12:00 minute video

Visual: We see a busy downtown intersection. The numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 appear in sequential order. Simultaneously, the screen slowly becomes blurry and fades to black until it is completely black at the number 5.

Sound effects: Clock ticking

Visual: The number 5 stays on the screen, and the words fade in to read: Every 5 seconds, someone in the world starts to lose their sight.

Visual: The words fade away and we see a man with a walking cane in a hallway and then we cut to see a man in a kitchen.

Narrator: In Canada, more than 600 000 people live with significant vision loss.

Visual: We see a women put on a pair of glasses. We then cut to a man walking with a guide dog. The screen fades to black.
We see the number 25 on a black screen.

Narrator: Over the next 25 years the number of Canadians losing their sight is expected to double.

Visual: We see a women walking down stairs with a guide dog.

Narrator: Vision loss can be devastating.

Visual: We see a man and women reading Braille and cut to a girl reading Braille.

Narrator: Without assistance in adjusting to vision loss, many people live in isolation and fear.

Visual: The screen fades to white and the number 1 fades onto the screen.

Narrator: But one organization is leading the way to help Canadians with vision loss: CNIB.

Visual: CNIB logo fades onto screen. The screen fades to white, and facts about the organization fade onto the screen.

Text on screen: Trust: 90 years of experience Canadian: active in communities all across Canada Dedication: 10,000 volunteers and 1,100 employees

Narrator: We’re earning your trust, with 90 years of experience. We’re a Canadian organization, active in communities all across Canada. We’re proving our dedication with 10,000 committed volunteers and 1100 employees, all experts at what they do.

Visual: The three facts fade off the screen.

Narrator: At CNIB, our mission is to be the leader in promoting vision health and enhancing independence for Canadians with vision loss.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Aaron Marsaw’s story

Text on screen: Aaron Marsaw: Lawyer

Aaron: My name is Aaron Marsaw. I am currently a lawyer.

Visual: On the screen, we see Aaron sitting in an office.

Aaron: I lost my eye sight in 1985 due to a brain tumor and cyst behind the optic nerve. My initial reaction when I lost my eye sight was one of frustration, anger and depression. I think all at different stages.

Visual: The screen fades to black then back to Aaron

Aaron: I think the most important services that I’ve received from the staff and volunteers at CNIB have been the orientation and mobility because that’s given me a sense of independence and how I move about in the community and generally I think also the library has been a tremendous service.

Visual: On the screen, we see a walking stick. As the camera moves up we see that it’s Aaron walking in a hallway.

Visual: We now see a man in front of a microphone recording his voice as he reads a book.

Visual: We now see rows and rows of files in a library.

Aaron: For example in law school a number of books were put into Daisy format for me. And that was tremendously helpful because law books as you could imagine can get quite thick and quite cumbersome to work through and the Daisy technology was excellent for being able to work through different parts of laws very quickly and easily.

Visual: We see Aaron using on a Daisy Machine.

Visual: We now see Aaron sitting in an office.

Visual: The screen fades to white.

Narrator: CNIB has one of the largest libraries in the world for people with vision loss, with thousands of titles in braille, printbraille and talking book format, as well as access to telephone, reference and online services.

Visual: We see Aaron in an office.

Aaron: I do feel CNIB has helped me to improve my quality of life immensely. I think that it’s given me a sense of independence that I don’t think I otherwise would have had. And I think it’s also made me realize that being blind doesn’t mean that I have to stop pursuing my dreams and my aspirations.

Visual: The screen fades to black

Visual: The number 75% fades onto the screen

Narrator: 75% of working-age adults with significant vision loss are unemployed.

Visual: On the screen, we see people with vision loss reading Braille.

Narrator: Many of them face barriers such as employer attitudes or a lack of accessible transportation or technology.

Visual: On the screen, we now see a building and people with guide dogs and walking sticks.

Narrator: The CNIB advocacy program is dedicated to ensuring that all Canadians have equal access to the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, regardless of vision loss.

Visual: On the screen, we see a pair of hands reading Braille.

Visual: We now see a women doing artwork.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Michael Risen’s story

Text on screen: Michael Risen: President of luxury resort company

Michael: My name is Michael Risen. I am the President of a privately held corporation that owns eighteen resorts around the world and growing.

Visual: We see Michael Risen in an office.

Michael: I was diagnosed with glaucoma 14 years ago when I lost my left eye and was told it was only a matter of time until I would lose sight of my right.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Visual: We again see Michael’s office.

Michael: When I first learned that I was losing sight and they took my driver’s license away, I felt as though I was losing all independence, all ability to go out, to socialize, to work, to function at all.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Visual: We again see Michael’s office.

Michael: My friends were perhaps at the time a little too over supportive. Not knowing quite what I needed. And they had no idea how to help. Nor did I know what to ask for until I came to CNIB. They taught me how to cook again. I looked after my 90 year old father, was a primary caregiver. They taught me how to label food.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Visual: We again see Michael’s office.

Michael: They taught me how to label clothes so I could match them. They taught me enough Braille to get by. They taught me how to use a computer, something I had never done.

Visual: The screen fades to white.

Narrator: CNIB is the only organization to offer a full range of programs and services to people with vision loss as well as their families.

Visual: We again see Michael at the office.

Michael: Once I got involved in the program, the mobility became very intense. To the point where I can now travel anywhere in the world and feel comfortable and feel safe.

Visual: On the screen we see Michael on the street talking to a man.

Visual: We now see Michael in front of an Airport Limo with a suitcase beside him.

Michael: When we learn our independence, when we get back our confidence thanks to the programs they offer, we are able to function in any role in society. Unassisted, independently, creatively, and with enthusiasm.

Visual: We see a walking stick and the camera moves up to see Michael and the same man as before walking down the street together.

Michael: Today I would not be working and traveling all over the world if it were not for CNIB.

Visual: We again see Michael at the office.

Michael: In terms of quality of life I feel as though prior to joining this course, I had a very low quality of life. Now, I love my life and I would not trade it with anybody I meet.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Visual: The screen now fades to white.

Narrator: We are a leader in vision health research.

Visual: On the screen, we see a woman getting her eyes examined.

Narrator: CNIB funds and conducts groundbreaking vision health research. Each year we spend over a million dollars to support projects that focus on ways to prevent, treat and ultimately cure eye disease, and improve the quality of life for people living with vision loss.

Visual: On the screen, we see a woman working in a research lab.

Story of Iolanda Palumbo

Text on screen: Iolanda Palumba: Mom

Iolanda: My name is Iolanda Palumbo.

Visual: On the screen we see Iolanda Palumbo speaking to the camera and several cuts to images of her and her son, as well as her on her computer.

Iolanda: In 2002 I started to get really bad headaches and I noticed that in my left eye I started to get some grey spotting.

Visual: The screen fades out and then back in on Iolanda.

Iolanda: I was told that it was just migraine headaches and not to worry about it. A year later I noticed worsening of vision in my left eye.

Visual: The screen fades out then back in on Iolanda.

Iolanda: We did further testing and after doing a lumber puncture I found out that I had a condition called Suto Tumor Cerebri. Which is similar to increased pressure in the brain. And what that does is it crushes your optic nerves if it is not taken care of. By the time we figured all this out unfortunately the damage had been done. And at this point now I have no vision in my left eye and about 20% vision left in my right eye.

Visual: The screen fades out then back in on Iolanda.

Iolanda: I have light perception, I can see shadows moving. It’s something that people I guess don’t understand, that being blind doesn’t mean that you are completely in the dark, that all you see is darkness.

Visual: The screen fades to white.

Narrator: 9 out of 10 people CNIB assist have some vision.

Visual: We see Iolanda again in her home.

Iolanda: At CNIB one of the programs that I was able to take part in was the independent learning skills program which showed me how to do my regular household chores and everyday tasks.

Visual: On the screen, we see Iolanda in the kitchen with her son.

Visual: We now see Iolanda at a computer learning a technical support program.

Iolanda: Another program I used was their technical support. I was given a computer program through CNIB. It’s called JAWS. It allows me to type, and it allows me to hear what I’m typing.

Visual: On the screen, we see Iolanda in her home.

Iolanda: And what that allows me to do is to keep contact with all my family members.

Visual: On the screen, we see Iolanda walking outside with her family, hand in hand.

Iolanda: We made the decision to have a child after CNIB taught me that I can move forward and go on and do all of the things that I wanted to do initially before losing my eye sight.

Visual: On the screen, we see Iolanda playing with her son and Tickle Me Elmo

Iolanda: They came in, they showed me how to change a diaper, how to feed Julian. They were there for me and I knew that I was going to be ok, that I was going to be able to do it.

Visual: On the screen we again see Iolanda in her home. The screen fades to black.

Leena & Sharad Ghanekar’s Story

Text on screen: Leena and Sharad Ghanekar: Retired Systems Analyst and retired Civil Engineer

Leena: My name is Leena Ghanekar I worked in an IT department for all my life, now I’m retired.

Sharad: My name is Sharad Ghanekar.

Visual: On the screen, we see Leena and Sharad.

Sharad: I’m a retired civil engineer.

Visual: On the screen, we see Leena talking.

Leena: My husband realized he was developing vision loss about ten years ago. We weren’t sure whether it was going to last. We were confused. We were scared. And I was a little bit angry for this happening. And a whole lot of responsibility all of a sudden that how are we going to handle this, how is our life going to be.

Visual: The screen fades out then back in on Leena.

Leena: The CNIB representative called us and the lady came over and she gave us a lot of helpful hints. She took him around the block to actually walk with him to see how he should cross the road.

Visual: The screen fades out then back in on Leena.

Leena: It is very important for the public to be aware of how vision loss can happen

Visual: The screen fades to black. The number 250 000 fades in.

Narrator: 250 000 Canadians live with glaucoma.

Visual: On the screen 1/2 fades in.

Narrator: Half don’t even know they have it

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Visual: We see an image of a public education seminar at CNIB.

Narrator: From local community events to public-speaking engagements and international conferences, CNIB informs and educates Canadians about maintaining good vision health

Visual: On the screen, we again see Leena.

Leena: I am a lot more concerned about my own vision health because now I know what a person with impairment to their vision has to go through.

Visual: We see Leena and Sharad walking down a hallway together.

Leena: If people have questions about keeping their own eye sight safe and good, they can go to CNIB and CNIB has help available in that respect also.

Visual: We cut back to image of interview with Leena.

Leena: Not only for already vision impaired people but people who have good eye sight. Now that I know that all the CNIB facilities are available and the products are available, it makes life a lot easier and it gives me a comfort as to if I have any questions I can go to them and get their help and get their advice.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Visual: On the screen, we see kids engaging in activities, playing.

Narrator: In Canada, more than 17 000 children and teens live with vision loss. CNIB is dedicated to helping them prepare for the future.

Visual: We see children helping out on the Habitat for Humanity construction site and talking to the CNIB counselors.

Narrator: One of our programs is the SCORE Leadership Camp. Here, teens participate in sports, volunteer in community projects such as Habitat for Humanity, and learn valuable team-building and career-development skills.

Visual: We see children smiling and having fun.

Narrator: But most importantly, they learn to believe in themselves, meet friends and have fun.

Visual: The screen fades to black.

Visual: The screen fades to white, words fade on to screen.

Text on screen: Canadians need CNIB.

Visual: We see a woman holding the hand of a man with vision loss.

Narrator: CNIB is the primary source of help, support, information, and, most importantly, hope, for all Canadians affected by vision loss.

Visual: We see Leena and Sharad looking at vision health information on CNIB site.

Narrator: CNIB is here for anyone looking for information, or ways to prevent vision loss.

Visual: On the screen we see a room with CNIB products.

We are Canada's largest supplier of innovative consumer products and our accessible design consultants have provided expertise for some of Canada's most important public spaces. CNIB helps to make any product, service, website or location more accessible for everyone.

Visual: On the screen, we see a woman walking down stairs with a guide dog.

Narrator: Each year, about 10,000 people come to CNIB for the first time. 500 of them are children.

Visual: On the screen we see a variety of shots of children, a woman with a guide dog, a man reading with a magnifying glass, and a man browsing a computer.

Narrator: However, less than 30% of our funding comes from the government. CNIB relies on private and corporate fundraising and donations for the rest.

Visual: On the screen, we see a woman doing an eye exam.

Narrator: Without continuous funding and volunteer support, CNIB will not be able to assist the growing number of Canadians experiencing vision loss. By supporting CNIB, you are investing in your own future.

Visual: On the screen, a busy intersection fades on again.

Visual: The numbers 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 appear on the screen in sequential order. Simultaneously, the screen is becoming whiter and when it gets to the number 1, words fade on beside it

Text on screen: 1 person can make a difference.

Sound effects: Clock ticking in time with the numbers.

Narrator: One person can make a difference. And there’s no better time than now.

Visual: The logo fades onto the screen, as well as CNIB’s slogan “Vision health. Vision hope.”

Visual: CNIB’s contact information appears on the screen.

cnib.ca

1-800-563-2642

Narrator: To volunteer, donate or learn more about our programs and services, visit cnib.ca OR call 1-800-563-2642.